Dangers of Diet drinks/Cola Products

5 serious health risks of drinking diet soda

Charis Brown

Here are 5 reasons to avoid drinking diet soda

 

1. It can harm your heart.

According to research from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, men who drank two or more servings of Diet Coke had a 23% higher risk of developing heart failure. In the study, 42,400 men were tracked over 12 years and 3,604 cases of a positive association between sweetened beverage consumption and risk of heart failure were...

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Here are 5 reasons to avoid drinking diet soda

 

1. It can harm your heart.

According to research from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, men who drank two or more servings of Diet Coke had a 23% higher risk of developing heart failure. In the study, 42,400 men were tracked over 12 years and 3,604 cases of a positive association between sweetened beverage consumption and risk of heart failure were found. In addition, 509 people died of the condition.

The study did not differentiate between diet soda and regular soda — but instead showed an equal amount of risk between both. Drinks included Diet Coke, Pepsi Max and other beverages that use artificial sweeteners.

 

2. It can cause kidney problems.

A study done back in 2009 of over 3,000 women found a link between diet soda and kidney problems.

‘While more study is needed, our research suggests that higher sodium and artificially sweetened soda intake are associated with greater rate of decline in kidney function,’ said Dr. Julie Lin MD, MPH, FASN of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston and coauthor of the study.

Researchers found that women who drank two or more diet sodas a day had as much as a 30% decrease in kidney function.

‘Thirty percent is considered significant,” said Dr. Lin. At least five studies have been done attempting to make the connection between soda and kidney disease, but only two have been significant.

 

3. It can increase your risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

Several studies have linked diet drinks to increased risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

Metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors that raises your risk for heart disease and other health problems like diabetes and stroke, in addition to increased belly fat and high cholesterol.

A 2008 study of about 10,000 adults at the University of Minnesota found that 1 soda drink a day led to a 34% increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Additionally, another study found a 36% greater risk of metabolic syndrome related to drinking diet soda and a 67% greater risk of type 2 diabetes compared with people who did not drink any diet soda.

 

4. It leads to ‘increased waist circumference.’

Two studies done by the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, (one in 2011 and another in 2015), found that two servings of diet soda, specifically Diet Coke, increased waistlines by over three inches.

Compared with non-users, diet soft drink consumers had a 70% increase in ‘waist circumference’ than did non-users. But, frequent consumers — defined as consuming two or more diet drinks a day — had a 500% waistline increase over non-users, according to researchers.

Why is this? According to Perdue University, diet sweeteners trick the body and disrupt its natural ability to regulate calorie intake.

‘Artificial sweeteners trigger insulin, which sends your body into fat storage mode and leads to weight gain,’ says Brooke Alpert, RD, author of the book The Sugar Detox.

 

5. It alters your mood.

Scary as it is, aspartame, or the sweetener in Diet Coke, is on an EPA list of potentially dangerous chemicals contributing to neurotoxicity, right beneath arsenic.

The American Academy of Neurology has discovered that artificially sweetened drinks are connected to a higher risk of depression – at least 30% as much.

‘Sweetened beverages, coffee and tea are commonly consumed worldwide and have important physical—and may have important mental—health consequences,’ said study author Honglei Chen, MD, PhD, with the National Institutes of Health in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

‘Our research suggests that cutting out or down on sweetened diet drinks or replacing them with unsweetened coffee may naturally help lower your depression risk,’ he said. ‘More research is needed to confirm these findings, and people with depression should continue to take depression medications prescribed by their doctors.’

But, the good news is, coffee was connected to a lower risk of depression in the study.

 

Here are some better alternatives

So what might be some better alternatives to diet soda? If you don’t like the non-flavor of water, you could try Vitamin Water Zero which has zero calories but it sweetened with Stevia instead of aspartame, or you could opt for coffee or tea instead.

Additionally, you might try sparkling mineral water, but sparkling water also has some risks. The best (and cheapest) alternative to soda really is just plain ‘ole 100% water.

Source:

http://clark.com/health-health-care/diet-soda-risks-diet-coke/

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Why Is Diet Soda So Bad For Your Brain?

By: David DiSalvo

You may have heard about results from a pair of studies that hit earlier this month about the effects of sugary and diet drinks on the brain. Part of the results aren’t surprising—the effects of sugary drinks are well studied and the findings are fairly consistent: drinking too much of anything with excessive sugar, especially high-fructose forms of sugar, is antithetical to good health in...

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You may have heard about results from a pair of studies that hit earlier this month about the effects of sugary and diet drinks on the brain. Part of the results aren’t surprising—the effects of sugary drinks are well studied and the findings are fairly consistent: drinking too much of anything with excessive sugar, especially high-fructose forms of sugar, is antithetical to good health in multiple ways, brain health included.

The part that is surprising involved the potential effects of diet drinks on the brain. A study in the journal Stroke showed a correlation between drinking diet soda and both stroke and dementia: people who drank at least one diet soda a day were three times as likely to have a stroke or develop dementia as those who avoided the beverages. The researchers' conclusion: "Artificially sweetened soft drink consumption was associated with a higher risk of stroke and dementia."

Several caveats should be noted. First, this was a cohort study searching for correlations between behaviors and health outcomes, and that’s always tricky. It’s difficult to isolate specific factors and it’s impossible to account for every possible factor, so there’s always going to be some fuzziness in the results. Second, this study focused on older adults, so we can’t say what’s true here (if it is) necessarily applies to a larger population across age groups. And it’s possible that certain conditions developed during the course of the study, like diabetes, which could affect the results. Added to all of that, the researchers studied beverage consumption at different doses (recent intake and cumulative intake), which further complicates the analysis.

Having said that, it’s still mighty intriguing that a correlation with diet sodas appeared at all, since previous research had already uncovered a possible link with higher stroke risk. The findings in this study add some support to those results. The link with dementia, however, is new, and at minimum is enough cause for concern that it's worth studying further.

Why might diet sodas contribute to these risks? So far nobody knows for sure, although a grab bag of theories are out there, such as:

Diet sodas are designed to trick the brain into thinking it’s getting an extra dose of glucose (the brain’s fuel), but eventually the trick is on us because the brain adapts to not receiving the added glucose by overcompensating in other ways (leading to a variety of effects still under investigation).

Diet sodas could imbalance the bacterial jungle in our guts—the microbiome—causing unpredictable results. Since there’s a bacterial superhighway from gut to brain, which we know interacts with key neurotransmitters, this theory may eventually tell us more of a much bigger brain story.

Different artificial sweeteners in diet drinks have different effects, and there’s debate about which causes what. This study didn’t narrow down the exact types of artificial sweeteners that were consumed, so it’s an open question how one may have affected the brain differently than another.

We can’t draw solid conclusions from this study—it’s not a case of cause and effect—but we can look at the results in light of previous research and say there’s something here worth considering. In the meantime, curtailing how much of any artificial sweetener you ingest, along with added sugar, is a reasonable position to take.

The results were published in the journal Stroke.

Source:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2017/04/27/why-is-diet-soda-so-bad-for-your-brain/

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